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Glossary

C

Council of Australian Governments (COAG)

Peak intergovernmental forum in Australia, comprising the Prime Minister, State and Territory Premiers and Chief Ministers and the President of the Australian Local Government Association. Its role is to manage matters of national significance or matters that need co-ordinated action by all Australian governments.

Council of Australian Governments ABOUT COAG

Retrieved from https://www.coag.gov.au/about-coag

Country of birth

The name of the country you were born in.

Country of Initial registration

The country where you first obtained registration as a nurse/midwife.

Course

See Program, Approved program

Credit

Value assigned for the recognition of equivalence in content and learning outcomes between different types of learning and/or qualifications. Credit reduces the amount of learning required to achieve a qualification and may be through credit transfer, articulation, recognition of prior learning or advanced standing.

Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) (2013) AQF Glossary of Terminology

Retrieved from https://www.aqf.edu.au/sites/aqf/files/aqf_glossary_jan2013.pdf

Criminal history

Defined in the National Law as:
• Every conviction of the person for an offence, in a participating jurisdiction or elsewhere, and whether before or after the commencement of this Law.
• Every plea of guilty or finding of guilt by a court of the person for an offence, in a participating jurisdiction or elsewhere, and whether before or after the commencement of this Law and whether or not a conviction is recorded for the offence.
• Every charge made against the person for an offence, in a participating jurisdiction or elsewhere, and whether before or after the commencement of this Law.
• Under the National Law, spent convictions legislation does not apply to criminal history disclosure requirements.

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (2018) Legislation

Retrieved from https://www.ahpra.gov.au/About-AHPRA/What-We-Do/Legislation.aspx

Australian Health practitioner Regulation Agency (2015) Criminal history registration standard                  

Retrieved from https://www.ahpra.gov.au/Registration/Registration-Standards/Criminal-hi...

Criteria/criterion

Specific statements against which a program is to be evaluated, and which are designed to be addressed by an education provider when undergoing accreditation.

Australian Pharmacy Council (2019) Accreditation Standards for Pharmacy Degree and Intern Training Programs (Australia/New Zealand)                   

Retrieved from https://www.pharmacycouncil.org.au/standards-review/june19-accreditation...

Cultural safety

Concept was developed in a First Nations’ context and is the preferred term for nursing and midwifery. Cultural safety is endorsed by the Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM), who emphasise that cultural safety is as important to quality care as clinical safety. However, the “presence or absence of cultural safety is determined by the recipient of care; it is not defined by the caregiver” (CATSINaM, 2014, p. 9[1]).  Cultural safety is a philosophy of practice that is about how a health professional does something, not [just] what they do. It is about how people are treated in society, not about their diversity as such, so its focus is on systemic and structural issues and on the social determinants of health. Cultural safety represents a key philosophical shift from providing care regardless of difference, to care that takes account of peoples’ unique needs. It requires nurses and midwives to undertake an ongoing process of self-reflection and cultural self-awareness, and an acknowledgement of how a nurse’s/midwife’s personal culture impacts on care. In relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, cultural safety provides a de-colonising model of practice based on dialogue, communication, power sharing and negotiation, and the acknowledgment of white privilege. These actions are a means to challenge racism at personal and institutional levels, and to establish trust in healthcare encounters (CATSINaM, 2017b, p. 11[2]).  In focusing on clinical interactions, particularly power inequity between patient and health professional, cultural safety calls for a genuine partnership where power is shared between the individuals and cultural groups involved in healthcare. Cultural safety is also relevant to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health professionals. Non-Indigenous nurses and midwives must address how they create a culturally safe work environment that is free of racism for their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander colleagues (CATSINaM, 2017a[3]).

Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia (2018) Code of conduct for midwives

Retrieved from https://www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au/Codes-Guidelines-Statements/Pro...

Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives (CATSINaM) (2017) CATSINaM definition of Cultural Safety

Retrieved from https://www.catsinam.org.au/policy/cultural-safety

Current registration

Country where you currently hold registration as a nurse/midwife.

Current registration number

Registration number you were assigned when you first registered with a nursing/midwifery board.

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